• Register
  • Login
  • Archives

    Volume 1 Number 4 October 2015

    The Roles of a Soil Pedologist in Agro - Technology Transfer


    Pages: 50-56
    Authors: Chukwu, G. O. ; Okonkwo, E .I.
    Abstract
    A soil pedologist is a soil scientist who specializes in a branch of soil science that is concerned with identification, formation, and distribution of soils, which covers soil classification, soil genesis and survey as well as land evaluation. He interprets the results of his work in a simple, non-technical language in diagrammatic forms (maps) called interpretive soil maps. Examples are, land capability maps, soil suitability maps and soil fertility capability maps. They serve as visual aids for extension education in training the trainer or training of farmers. Literate farmers can use it without an aid. The maps should be able to assist a potential land user to solve soil – related problem or sets of problems such as soil fertility, erosion and drainage, in an area covered in the map with less difficulty. The interpretive maps should be able to provide information on the nature and distribution of a particular soil problem or sets of problems and enhance a potential user to predict soil attributes in an area covered by the map. Based on the maps, decisions on land use planning, dissemination and adoption of agricultural innovations can be effective within a recommendation domain.



    Determinant of Beniseed (Sesamum Indicum L.) Production among Beniseed Farmers in Mubi Region of Adamawa State, Nigeria


    Pages: 44-49
    Authors: Dia, Y. Z. ; Gwandi, O.
    Abstract
    The study examines the determinant of Beniseed (Sesamum Indicum L.) Production among Beniseed Farmers in Mubi Region of Adamawa State, Nigeria a multi stage sampling technique was used to select 100 beniseed farmers in the study area. The study used a stochastic frontier production model to estimate the efficiency of the farmers; the empirical result revealed that farm size, seed and herbicide were positive and statistically significant at 1% level and family labour was also was also positive and statistically significant at 5% level in the study. The estimated gamma (ϒ) parameter of 0.799 in the study area indicated the 79% of the total variation in beniseed output is due to the technical inefficiencies in the study. The mean technical efficiency (ϰ) was 0.81 in the region, while Return to Scale (RTS) was 0.94 in the study. It was concluded that there is a positive and significant relationship between farm size, quality of seed used, herbicide used, family labour and beniseed output in the study.